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World Stage continues with the world premiere of Transmission of the Invisible, a stunning multi-media dance work by Dora Award winning Artistic Director Peter Chin

TORONTO, January 30, 2008Harbourfront Centre presents the riveting world premiere of Transmission of Invisible from Canadian choreographer Peter Chin and Tribal Crackling Wind, as part of World Stage 2008. Combining the talents of Canadian and Cambodian dancers, alongside video projections by Cylla von Tiedemann, Chin’s Transmission of the Invisible explores the tragic impact of the Khmer Rouge genocide on Cambodian culture, while emphasizing the urgent need to nurture the heritage that continues.

Transmission of the Invisible takes place from February 6 to 9, at 8 p.m., at the Enwave Theatre, Harbourfront Centre, 231 Queens Quay West. Single tickets: $30. 13/13 rush ticket programme: students and seniors can purchase one $13 ticket, per valid ID, cash only, 13 minutes before curtain (subject to availability). Package discounts up to 20%. Harbourfront Centre’s World Stage 2008 showcases the best theatre, music and dance through May 10. For tickets and information, the public can call 416-973-4000 or visit www.harbourfrontcentre.com/worldstage.

With over three years of research and development, Peter Chin’s world premiere of Transmission of the Invisible explores the urgency to reinvigorate the essence of Cambodian culture in the aftermath of the Khmer Rouge genocide. How does creative energy pass from person to person, from nature to person or from a culture to a person? The work explores the physical traces of the transmission of the invisible, whether it be unseen messages from nature that enter the soul, or the passing on of the spirit of a people through the teaching of its cultural forms (as was done in Cambodia in the 80s after the end of the Khmer Rouge regime). Chin explores through a fusion of traditional and contemporary dance the importance of this creative generational exchange. This multi-media work is a powerful and passionate expression of how tradition and meaning is so easily torn by the cruel cuttings of war. Choreography and costumes by Peter Chin. Music/Sound Design by Peter Chin and Garnet Willis. Performed by Louis Laberge-Côté, Andrea Nann and Heidi Strauss (Toronto), Phon Sopheap and Yim Savann (Cambodia). Video by Cylla von Tiedemann. Lighting by Arun Srinivasan. Set design by David Duclos.

Founded in 1999, Tribal Crackling Wind is an interdisciplinary company based in Toronto. Shaped by the leadership of its multi-faceted Artistic Director Peter Chin, the company’s distinctive creativity brings riveting ritual-based work to the stage, and engages a multitude of disciplines.

Harbourfront Centre’s World Stage 2008 presents a diverse collection of innovative and exciting performing arts events in one visionary series with a number of world and Canadian premieres of some of the world’s most exceptional artistic endeavours.

Upcoming World Stage performances: world premiere of Opera to Go 2008—Tapestry New Opera Works (Toronto), February 15-17 & 20-23; Toronto premiere of Cooped—Spymonkey (U.K.), March 5-14; FreeFall—The Theatre Centre (Toronto) in partnership with World Stage 2008, March 6-16; world premiere of Every Time I See Your Picture I Cry—Daniel Barrow (Winnipeg), presented as part of the 21st annual Images Festival, April 10-12; Canadian premiere of Chapel/Chapter—Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company (USA), April 16-19; Canadian premiere of Damascus—Traverse Theatre Company (Scotland), April 22-26; Toronto premiere of Short Works—Black Grace (New Zealand), April 30-May 3; and Toronto premiere of The Space Between—C!RCA (Australia), May 6-10 who also perform 46 Circus Acts in 45 Minutes on May 7.

Additional information, images and artist links are provided on the Harbourfront Centre website at www.harbourfrontcentre.com/worldstagemedia.

FOCUS: Sacred
From January to June, Harbourfront Centre asks the big question—What is Sacred? What is held sacred varies from culture to culture, country to country and person to person. What do you believe in? Are there universal truths in the world we live in? How important is ritual and belief to contemporary life? Have we reached a point where nothing is sacred anymore? Sacred is part of an ongoing exploration of ideas in programming at Harbourfront Centre. Our Lens. Your View.

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Media Contacts:
Linda Liontis
416-973-4381
lliontis@harbourfrontcentre.com

Shane Gerard
416-973-4518
sgerard@harbourfrontcentre.com




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