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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Planet IndigenUS Festival Co-Produced by Woodland Cultural Centre
The world’s largest celebration of contemporary Indigenous culture continues
Part II: August 15-19
TORONTO, ON (July 19, 2012) – The biggest contemporary Indigenous cultural festival in the world continues at Harbourfront Centre. Planet IndigenUS co-produced by Woodland Cultural Centre is a ten-day multidisciplinary celebration of contemporary international Indigenous culture with events at Harbourfront Centre, Woodland Cultural Centre in Brantford and at partner institutions around Toronto and the region and taking place from August 10-19.

Below, a rundown of events occurring during the second half of the ten-day festival. Highlights of the second half of Planet IndigenUS include:
• Musical performances by an international assortment of artists including: Derek Miller’s Robbie Robertson Tribute; the hyper-modern-meets-deeply-traditional sounds of Norwegian group Transjoik; New Zealand reggae-dub-funk-and-more act Rhombus; and one of the world’s only Didgeribone masters, Tjupurru;
• Australian dance-theatre group Polytoxic’s multi-media, audience-participatory outdoor performance on and around Harbourfront Centre’s Natrel® Pond;
• Aboriginal cooking demos and discussions featuring The Wolfman, Rich Francis and others;
Susuriwka – Willow Bridge, a collaboration between Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, Yokohama Noh Theatre and Ainu (Japan) musician Oki, and Cheri Maracle’s one-woman show about Pauline Johnson, Paddle Song;
• A performance by the legendary singer Susan Aglukark at Woodland Cultural Centre;
• …and many more events happening across the city and region…!

Listings information for festival events is below, and covers events at Harbourfront Centre, co-producer Woodlands Cultural Centre and at partner institutions around the GTA. More info is available at the festival website, harbourfrontcentre.com/planetindigenus. For additional information and complete event listings, the public may visit harbourfrontcentre.com/summer or call the Information Hotline at 416-973-4000. Harbourfront Centre is located at 235 Queens Quay West in the heart of downtown Toronto’s waterfront.

ABOUT HARBOURFRONT CENTRE SUMMER FESTIVALS
Harbourfront Centre is an innovative, not-for-profit cultural organization which provides internationally renowned programming in the arts, culture, education and recreation, in the heart of Toronto's downtown waterfront. Our summer festival season runs from Victoria Day weekend through Thanksgiving weekend, and features over 20 festivals and events that offer The World in One Place. For more information visit harbourfrontcentre.com/summer

ABOUT WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE
The Woodland Cultural Centre is a non-profit organization which preserves and promotes the culture and heritage of the First Nations of the Eastern Woodland area.
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Media Contact: Jon Campbell | jcampbell@harbourfrontcentre.com | 416 973 4655

For listings info, hi-res images and more media resources, visit the festival’s media page:
harbourfrontcentre.com/summer/media/planetindigenus/


HARBOURFRONT CENTRE EVENTS

MUSIC
Arthur Renwick
Friday, Aug. 17 at 8 p.m.
Accomplished artist and singer/songwriter Arthur Renwick is a storyteller who plays bottleneck slide on a dobro and cigar-box guitar. His debut album, The Cigar Box Chronicles, captures the experience of love, loss, liquor, hope, faith, birth and death in the small fishing village of Kitamaat, B.C., where he was born and raised within the Haisla Nation.

Benny Walker
Friday, Aug. 17 at 9 p.m.
Indigenous singer/songwriter Benny Walker is establishing himself as one of Australia’s most charming and engaging independent artists. Nominated for Most Promising New Talent at the Deadly Awards and at the National Indigenous Music Awards 2011, his soulful voice and love of diverse musical styles sees him combine blues and roots with reggae to create a unique experience.

Robbie Robertson Tribute Show featuring Derek Miller and special guests
Friday, Aug. 17 at 9:30 p.m.
This evening celebrates an innovator and icon in the Indigenous artistic community, and the work and person of one of Canada’s best songwriters, Robbie Robertson. The host and guide through Robertson’s best works is Derek Miller, who toured with iconic Canadian vocalist Buffy Sainte-Marie, and in 2003 won the Aboriginal Recording of the Year Juno for his first album; his second Juno for his sophomore release came in 2008, as did a nomination in 2011 for his third album.

Planet IndigenUS Hip Hop Dance Party: Winnipeg’s Most
Friday, Aug. 17 at 11 p.m.
Multiple Aboriginal Peoples’ Choice Music Award winners Winnipeg’s Most headline this exciting evening of hip hop dance and music. The group’s music is a celebration of not only Indigenous culture but of overcoming challenges and stereotypes.

The Métis Fiddler Quartet
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 1 p.m.
The Métis Fiddler Quartet reflects the beauty and diversity of the Aboriginal fiddle traditions in Canada, drawing on their diverse backgrounds in classical music, jazz and beyond.

Amanda Rheaume
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 2:30 p.m.
Métis singer/songwriter Rheaume is a powerful vocalist with just a touch of grit and an instantly-accessible roots-pop sound.

Transjoik (Norway)
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 3 p.m.
Equal parts song, joik (a Nordic Aboriginal singing style), a muezzin’s call to prayer, rap and recitation, the four musicians in Transjoik use their voices in an altogether new way. The group’s sound is derived from old joik wax-cylinder recordings processed through electronic, ambient and trance music, establishing a mood that is at once modern and timeless. In partnership with the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

WiijiiNiijii Lodge
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 4 p.m.
A WiijiiNiijii (“we-gee-knee-gee”) Lodge is a place where friends are welcomed and celebrations are shared. Planet IndigenUS creates our own onsite version, today hosting Direction Four, a coed folk-rock-meets-classic-rock outfit from Kettle & Stoney Point First Nation; Toronto jazz trio O Jazz; and jazz composer and musician Robin Ranger.

Emerging Talent Showcase: Ali Fontaine and Cris Derksen
Saturday, Aug.18 at 4:30 p.m.

Ali Fontaine
Ali Fontaine is a 17-year-old country artist from Manitoba’s Sagkeeng First Nation who won her first singing competition at age 8 and hasn’t looked back since. She scooped up 3 awards at the 2011 Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards and saw her first single go to number 1 on the National Aboriginal Music Countdown. In partnership with Manitoba Aboriginal and Northern Affairs.

Cris Derksen
Cellist Derksen is known for captivating solo performances that combine her classical training and Aboriginal ancestry with new-school electronics, building layers of sound into often surprisingly slamming dance music. While she has performed with hip hop star Kanye West, Kinnie Starr, Lightning Dust (Black Mountain) and many more artists, her solo work has been turning heads: Her 2011 debut album The Cusp was nominated for a Western Canadian Music Award and won a 2011 Canadian Aboriginal Music Award; in 2012 she received funding from First Tracks to make an APTN music video for “pow.wow.wow” and was nominated for a Dora Award for her work on the soundtrack to Kaha:wi Dance Theatre’s TransMigration.

IsKwé
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 8 p.m.
Born into an Irish and Cree/Dene family, Winnipeg native IsKwé pulls from both of her own cultures and beyond to create a unique trip-hop-meets-eclectic-soul sound. Having just wrapped up a US tour with the infamous NYC collective FreakNasty, she remains committed to giving back to the Native community, promoting positive change and education through facilitating youth workshops and supporting various native youth organizations in Canada and the States.

Rhombus
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 9:30 p.m.
Known as one of New Zealand’s most original and energetic live acts, Rhombus blends hip-hop, soul, funk, dub and reggae, spliced together with socially conscious lyrics. The band has performed alongside St Germain, Michael Franti, Gomez and more, and won a slew of awards including New Zealand's Most Promising New Act in 2002; Best Video, Best Electronic Album and Best Album at 2003's New Zealand b-Net Music Awards; and was Best Aotearoa (New Zealand) Album finalist at the NZ 2006 Music Awards. The group also works on a number of causes and with various organizations including Greenpeace, SurfAid, the Cancer Society and the Peace Boat. In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

Don Ross
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 1:30 & 3 p.m.
Don Ross’ finger-picking style won him an unprecedented two victories at the US National Fingerstyle Guitar Competition in 1988 and 1996; he put out his debut album in 1989 on the Toronto label Duke Street Records before signing with Columbia/Sony for three subsequent albums.

Tjupurru (Australia)
Sunday, Aug.19 at 2 p.m.
Tjupurru plays the Didgeribone, a combination trombone-didgeridoo, which alone would make him a unique artist. But combined with a “Face Bass” – an in-mouth microphone, of sorts – and loops, samples and electronics, he takes things even further, creating an altogether new form of music.

WiijiiNiijii Lodge
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 2 p.m.
A WiijiiNiijii (“we-gee-knee-gee”) Lodge is a place where friends are welcomed and celebrations are shared. Planet IndigenUS creates our own onsite version, today hosting Herbie Barnes, who is well-known for roles on the stage and big and small screens and as a director, writer and dramaturge, as well as for his work in inner city schools and with survivors of abuse.

Leela Gilday
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 3:30 p.m.
A captivating Dene singer/songwriter, Leela Gilday takes listeners on a journey through a musical world where freedom and joy balance sorrow and injustice. Her sophomore release, Calling All Warriors, won a Western Canadian Music Award, a Canadian Aboriginal Music Award and an Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Award.

FOOD

Modern Aboriginal Cuisine with Rich Francis
Saturday & Sunday, Aug. 18 & 19 at 2 p.m.
Rich Francis, a graduate of the Stratford Chef School, veteran of Toronto’s Splendido and Danny Meyer’s Tabla (NYC) and current proprietor of Aboriginal Culinary Concepts in London, Ontario, will conduct a demonstration of what he calls Modern Aboriginal Cuisine. By creatively producing a traditional dining experience using Indigenous commodities, culture, tradition and modern cooking techniques, Modern Aboriginal Cuisine, says Francis, “is an emotion rather than a conceptual entity in and of itself.”

Cooking With The Wolfman
Saturday & Sunday, Aug. 18 & 19 at 4 p.m.
An enthusiastic educator and entertainer, Chef David Wolfman is an internationally-recognized and award-winning expert in wild game and traditional Aboriginal cuisine. A member of the Xaxli’p First Nation from BC, Wolfman is a classically-trained chef, Culinary Arts professor at George Brown College of Applied Arts and Technology in Toronto and executive producer and host of the popular Cooking With the Wolfman television program, on which he displays his signature Aboriginal Fusion.

What You Eat Isn’t What You Grow
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 3 p.m.
With a global food security crisis looming, what we eat isn’t always what we grow. Our panelists – Aaron Joseph Bear Robe, Ashlee Cooper, Duke Redbird, John Croutch – will discus issues related to seed banks, genetically modified foods, co-op/community gardening and more, all from an IndigenUS, and global, perspective. Moderated by Lisa Myers. In partnership with Evergreen Brick Works.

FAMILY
String a Bead
Saturday & Sunday, Aug. 18 & 19 at 1 p.m.
In this fun craft activity, children will have the chance to create their own beaded bracelets or anklets with colourful beads.

Porcupine and Friends: Emilie Corbiere
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 1 & 3:30 p.m.
Emilie Corbiere, a descendant from Walpole Island First Nation, wrote her first play at the age of 8. In 2006, she wrote her first Aboriginal children’s storybook, Porcupine’s Bad Day, the first in what is now a four-book series. Each story employs both Ojibwe and English, teaching young readers new Ojibwe words.

Rabbit and Bear Paws
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 2 p.m.
Set in 1750’s colonized North America and featuring the comical adventures of two brothers, Rabbit and Bear Paws uses traditional native teachings and humour to teach life lessons from numerous pranks and mistakes while appreciating the unity of Native communities and how they related to one another peacefully.

VISUAL ARTS
captured speech writing back: Toronto
Saturday, June 30-Sunday, August 26
As part of the current exhibition, Tools for Conviviality, artist Raymond Boisjoly produced a public exterior text-based work on the south façade of The Power Plant conceived around the visual recuperation of the name “Toronto” premised on its meaning and origin. It foregrounds language as a cultural practice and brings a concern for Aboriginal languages to bear on text-based strategies in contemporary art.

NOT SO FAST
Saturday, July 21-Sunday, Sept 23
Objects tell a story through the way they are made, but value is often measured in terms of speed and efficiency, necessitating a reconsideration of time and place to reveal different kinds of value. This exhibition features the works of seven Indigenous artists as they engage and respond to various facets of consumer society and its many products and by-products including communication, stereotypes, obsolescence, extinction, colonialism, fast food and more. NOT SO FAST invites audiences to slow down and spend some time. Curated by Lisa Myers and featuring Christian Chapman, Vanessa Dion Fletcher, Bev Koski, Jean Marshall, Tania Willard, Luke Parnell and Maika'i Tubbs.

MATERIAL WEALTH: Revealing Landscape
Saturday, July 21-Sunday, Sept 23
Elemental materials have the ability to act as catalysts for ideas, as their place in the landscape prompts a view from a variety of perspectives. Sonny Assu, Michael Belmore, Lauren Blakey Ursula A. Johnson, Taliaferro Jones, Michelle Mendlowitz, Rebecca Horwitz and Silvia Taylor each explore their own favourite material and their meaning and trajectory across culture and geography

NOT FORGETTING
Saturday, July 21-Sunday, Sept 23
Eight artists remind us that knowledge and experience comes from our own lives, our family and our community. Curated by Patrick Macaulay and Lisa Myers and featuring Yael Brotman, Brenda Draney, Melissa General, Vanessa Hussey, Erika Iserhoff, Caroline Monnet, Rochelle Rubinstein and Kate Subak.

Frost: The Lives and Culture of the Sami People (Norway)
Friday-Sunday Aug. 10-12 & 17-19
Sami culture is one of hardship, driven by the extreme survival skills needed to get through the long gruelling Nordic arctic winters. The nomadic Sami have herded reindeer for centuries, but today, the culture is disappearing as many have moved to different parts of the country to lead “ordinary” modern lives, abandoning their traditional way of life. Fred Ivar Utsi Klemetsen, a Sami photographer, documents life in the north. In partnership with the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

This We Know… An Exhibition from the Aboriginal Visual Culture Program at OCAD University
Friday-Sunday Aug. 10-12 & 17-19
In this collection of work, art and design students respond to the sometimes difficult, often colourful, always inspiring history of the Indigenous people of the land we now call Canada. Spanning a range of aesthetic practices – from jewelry-making to sculpture, video and easel painting – the exhibition illustrates the interdisciplinarity of our program and the technical ability and expressive power of our students.

Sage Paul Fashion Show
Friday, Aug. 17 at 7 p.m.
Sage Paul creates modern Indigenous fashion, culturally-inspired apparel and accessories that are bold, classic and chic. Committed to creating an accurate representation of contemporary Indigenous people and ethically producing and commissioning unique, trendy and quality-made products, she works with both Indigenous and Western cultural and traditional concepts seeking to identify the “urban Indian” through her work. The fashions on display at this show have been designed specifically for Planet IndigenUS.

FILM
imagineNATIVE’s indigiFLIX: Music is the Medicine
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 8 p.m.
Over the past 20 years, blues-rocker Derek Miller has built a highly devoted fan base, received numerous awards – including two Junos – and played with a long list of world-class musicians, all the while struggling with addiction and personal loss. This revealing documentary follows the now-reinvigorated artist.

IndigenUS Short Film Series
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 1 p.m.
Somnium, the Latin word for ‘dream’, offers a modern creation myth with animation influenced by African tribal masks, 60s psychedelia and contemporary graphic design; Choke employs stop-motion animation to explore themes of urban isolation and the search for identity in modern society through following Jimmy, who has moved from the Rez to the city; Tungijuq stars Inuit singer-artist Tanya Tagaq in a computer-generated mix of live action and animation exploring the seal hunt and its meaning to the traditional way of life for the Inuit; File Under Miscellaneous is set in a dystopian urban hellscape in which a Mi’gMag man resolves to assimilate, taking surgical steps to achieve his goal; Games of the North follows four Inuit athletes competing across Alaska in ancestral games of strength; and Boxed In features a young woman of mixed ancestry struggling with an Equal Opportunity Form’s seemingly simple question: “Ethnicity – Choose One.”

Artists’ and Directors’ Talk
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 2 p.m.
imagineNative Film Festival’s Executive Director Jason Ryle moderates a discussion of the importance of Indigenous film and the process by which Michelle Latimer, Shane Belcourt, Nima Ehetemam and Noah Wohl have created their works.

Trudell
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 7:30 p.m.
Native American activist and poet John Trudell fuses his radical politics with music, writing and art in this biography combining images and archival footage with interviews and performances. The film reveals the philosophy and motivations behind Trudell's work and his relationship to contemporary Indian history.

Suddenly Sami (Min mors hemmelighet)
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 1 p.m.
This personal film about identity explores the director’s childhood and youth in Oslo. Unaware of her Sami heritage, the director wonders about her mother’s choice to withhold the information from her and about how – and, indeed, whether – to become, suddenly, a member of this Arctic people. In partnership with the Royal Norwegian Embassy and the Norwegian Film Institute

Weengushk Film Institute ‘Best Of’ Student Films
Sunday, Aug 19 at 3:30 p.m.
Weengushk Film Institute (WFI) is a not-for-profit artist-focused film and television-training centre in M'Chigeeng, Ontario dedicated to unlocking creative potential while developing market leading skills and experiences to its participants. The school is an innovative and entrepreneurial response to an identified and documented absence of training opportunities for youth in Northern Canada and within Canada. Today, the school screens its students’ films.

DANCE
Polytoxic: Trade Winds
Thursday, Aug. 16-Saturday, Aug. 18 at 9 p.m.
Australian dance-theatre company Polytoxic returns to Planet IndigenUS with a striking new performance taking place in and on Harbourfront Centre’s Natrel pond. Combining stunning projections, bold costuming and intricate physical performance, Trade Winds reimagines the exchanges of Pacific Ocean exploration past and present in a technicolour world where the traditions of the Pacific collide with the trappings of pop culture. The production invites audiences to contribute by adding to the collection of messages on tiny boats floating on the pond. This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Arts Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Susuriwka - Willow Bridge (NOTE: ticketed event at the Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay West)
Friday, Aug. 17 at 7 p.m., Saturday, Aug 18 at 2 & 7 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 19 at 7 p.m.
The North American premier of the collaboration between multiple 2012 Dora Award nominee Kaha:wi Dance Theatre and the Ainu (Japan) musician Oki. At its essence, Susuriwka - Willow Bridge explores the connection between Iroquois and Ainu song and dance, and expresses and honours our many shared cultural beliefs while seeking relevance and empowerment from ancient teachings in today’s reality.

Spirit Transforming
Friday, Aug. 17 at 8 p.m.
Dancers of Damelahamid are a Gitxsan dance company from the Northwest coast of BC with a rich history of masked dance. Through dramatic dance, captivating narrative and elaborate regalia, Damelahamid Dancers transform time and space and bridge the distance between ancient and living tradition. Spirit Transforming is an exploration and celebration of the magnificence of the essence of Aboriginal peoples.

Tjimur Dance Theatre
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 19 as part of the Closing Ceremonies
Inspired by Paiwan traditions, Tijimur Dance Theatre is one of Taiwan’s most exciting Indigenous contemporary dance companies. The company, whose Chinese name contains the characters for “old” and “new” and references the village that is the cradle of Paiwan culture, suggests that the group’s new spirit of dance is inspired by that ancient culture. In partnership with Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York and the Asian Canadian Special Events Association.

THEATRE
Paddle Song (NOTE: ticketed event at the Enwave Theatre)
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 8:30 p.m.
Celebrated singer-songwriter Cheri Maracle presents a one-woman stage play with words and music about the life of Pauline Johnson, the beloved Canadian poet and performer. Born to a Mohawk chief and his English wife in 1861, Johnson was white in the heart of Native lands and Indian to the white majority. She celebrated the natural beauty of the country while maintaining a fierce passion for her battered people, their honour, their pride and their beauty.

WORKSHOPS
Polytoxic Dance Workshop
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 1 p.m.
Fusing traditional Pacific dance with pop and contemporary dance moves, Polytoxic’s workshop will leave you hot, sweaty and smiling. Designed for all ages, it is a fun and varied take on shakin’ your booty. This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Arts Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Dancers of Damelahamid
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 5 p.m.
Dancers of Damelahamid are a Gitxsan dance company from the Northwest Coast of British Columbia. Workshop activities include interactive dance movement and background history on the Coastal First Nations of BC. Through basic movement instruction and sharing of song and story, participants will engage in the shared experience of dance in community.

“Aboriginal Recording of the Year” Juno Panel
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 5 p.m.
This panel discussion will review the “Aboriginal Recording of the Year” Juno category in depth by exploring questions surrounding Indigenous sound, culture and categorization in music.

The Vocal Workshop
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 7 p.m.
The workshop will explore the voice in all its forms. Norwegian band Transjoik will be showcasing the voice as an instrument and other artists will highlight the skilful effect of adding layers to instrumentation via the vocal chord.

Fingerstyle Guitar and Rhythm featuring Don Ross
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 3 p.m.
This workshop and meet-and-greet following Don’s performance will review Fingerstyle Guitar, the technique Ross uses in his performance.


MISC
Aboriginal Artisan Market
Friday, Aug. 17 at 6 p.m., Saturday & Sunday, Aug 18 & 19 at noon
The Aboriginal Artisan Market offers shoppers a wide variety of original fine arts and crafts from First Nations artisans showcasing a mix of various fine arts and craft work such as painting, beadwork, and jewellery from local and national artisans.


WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE EVENTS

MUSIC

Trailblazers and Music Makers: Ali Fontaine and Susan Aglukark
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 8 p.m.
First Nations, Inuit and Metis musicians have been creating music for thousands of years, remains a challenge to break into the mainstream. This program highlights the trailblazers of our time.

Ali Fontaine
Ali Fontaine is a 17-year-old country artist from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba who won her first singing competition at age 8 and hasn’t looked back since, scooping up 3 awards at the 2011 Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards and seeing her first single go to number 1 on the National Aboriginal Music Countdown chart. In partnership with Manitoba Aboriginal and Northern Affairs.

Susan Aglukark
One of Canada’s most unique and honoured artists, Aglukark is an Inuk from Arviat, Nunavut whose career has been defined by her ability to straddle and bridge both the world of her heritage and that of popular music generally. She entered the limelight in 1992 with her debut album, Arctic Rose, and quickly rose to national and international prominence, singing songs about her people but speaking to people everywhere.

New Credit Showcase
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 5 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 19 at 3 p.m.
Artists from the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation dazzle with an array of talent from their community.

Fusion of Roots: Joel Johnson, Benny Walker, Wes Martin and Logan Staats
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 6 p.m.
Fusion of Roots looks at the long musical traditions of roots and blues at Six Nations which has recently seen new kind of alternative rock emerge.

Joel Johnson
Award-winning blues artist Joel Johnson, who has shared the stage with blues greats including Jack De Keyzer and Mel Brown and garnered a collection of awards and nominations at the Native American Music Awards, Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards and Hamilton Music Awards, creates music that harkens to the blues artists of the past while forging ahead with a youthful edge.

Benny Walker
Indigenous singer/songwriter Benny Walker is establishing himself as one of Australia’s most charming and engaging independent artists. Nominated for Most Promising New Talent at the Deadly Awards and at the National Indigenous Music Awards 2011, his soulful voice and love of diverse musical styles sees him combine blues and roots with reggae to create a unique experience.

Wes Martin
An emerging artist drawing inspiration from Six Nations and creating a new genre of roots- and blues-infused rock.

Logan Staats
An emerging artist drawing inspiration from Six Nations and creating a new genre of roots- and blues-infused rock.

Rhombus
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 5 p.m.
Known as one of New Zealand’s most original and energetic live acts, Rhombus blends hip-hop, soul, funk, dub and reggae, spliced together with socially conscious lyrics. The band has performed alongside St Germain, Michael Franti, Gomez and more, and won a slew of awards including New Zealand's Most Promising New Act in 2002; Best Video, Best Electronic Album and Best Album at 2003's New Zealand b-Net Music Awards; and was Best Aotearoa (New Zealand) Album finalist at the NZ 2006 Music Awards. The group also works on a number of causes and with various organizations including Greenpeace, SurfAid, the Cancer Society and the Peace Boat. In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

VISUAL ARTS
Earthly Connections
Saturday, Aug. 11-Sunday, Oct. 7
This group exhibition will bring together three local Six Nations artists: Kelly Greene, Shelley Niro and Vince Bomberry. Each work will highlight First Nations people and their relationships to the land, whether it is a relationship of traditional stewardship or forced economic adaptation.

Greg Staats – A Retrospective
Saturday, Aug. 11-Sunday, Oct. 7
Greg Staats, from Ohsweken, Ont., Six Nations of the Grand River Territory, has been in the process of reconnecting with a traditional Haudenosaunee [Iroquois] restorative aesthetic that defines the multi¬plicity of relationships with trauma and renewal.

Four From Six
Saturday, Aug. 11-Sunday, Oct 7
In collaboration with curator Shelley Niro, the participating artists have worked to confront and transgress Aboriginal art expectations to create a conversation that explores and scrutinizes cultural stereotypes related to nostalgic echoes of a more natural landscape and traditional community, visions and dream-states, contemporary and urban Indigenous personas, and the recent political tensions surrounding the Six Nations land claims related to Caledonia and the Haldimand tract. Participating artists: Tracey Anthony, Jay Carrier, Elliott Doxtater-Wynn and Brenda Mitten.

Elizabeth Doxtater-Wynn: Teiotiokwaonháston/DeyodyogwaÇ«háhs:dÇ«h (Encircles Everything)
Saturday, Aug. 11-Sunday, Oct 7
Elizabeth Doxtater’s work, an installation created from corn husks and depicting a gathering of clanmothers and chiefs at the Tree of Peace, is an homage to the traditions of democracy and peace of the Haundenosaunee Confederacy.

The Graffiti Project
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 5 p.m.
This spring, the students of Kawenni:io/Gaweni:yo, a Mohawk and Cayuga immersion school at Six Nations, will embark on a series of art workshops learning the techniques, artistry and potential of graffiti. Taught by an artist from the group Racked Nation, the students’ pieces will be shown at the Woodland Cultural Centre.


FOOD
Corn Soup Cook-Off
Friday, Aug. 17 at 5 p.m.
The popular Corn Soup Cook-Off is an open community food competition where visitors sample Six Nations’ finest soups and vote for their favourites.

Dotah’s Cooking: Janace Henry
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 2 p.m.
Local chef Janace Henry shares her favourite family recipes which are about more than just the preparation of food. They represent the stories, relationships and traditions that are integral in Haudenosaunee families.

DANCE
Intro to Hoop
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 8 p.m.
Two-time world-champion hoop dancer and recent semi-finalist on Canada’s Got Talent Lisa Odjig conducts an introductory class on this traditional dance. Odjig has performed internationally including at the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics and for such dignitaries as Queen Elizabeth II and the Prime Minister of Canada.

THEATRE
Falen Johnson: Salt Baby
Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 7 p.m.
This first feature play by Six Nations actor, playwright and emerging dramaturg Falen Johnson explores the issue of what it is like to be a contemporary First Nations person growing up not looking like your typical ‘Indian’. Providing a humorous look at stereotypes and issues of identity, the play’s title is a term for “white-looking Indian” and one that Johnson, with her fair skin and curly hair, had often thrown her way. A Q&A with the playwright, actors and director follows the performance.

FAMILY
Family Fun Tent
Saturday & Sunday, Aug. 18 & 19 at 2 p.m.
Bring the little ones and get creative in the Family Fun Tent, where an array of arts and craft activities can be enjoyed by all. Each one hour workshop has been designed to coincide with the events and art activities of the festival.

FILM
Film Programme: The Creator’s Game
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 9 p.m.
In 2010, the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team forfeited the World Championship when they were denied entry into England because of their Haudenosaunee passports. This documentary follows the team on their journey to the 2011 championships in Prague – a fight for both gold and recognition of their nationhood. The Creator’s Game was the Documentary Pitch Prize winner at imagineNATIVE 2010.

WORKSHOP
Painting Workshop – Introduction to Mixed Media
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 4 p.m.
Abstract artist Tracey-Mae Chambers leads a workshop emphasizing experimentation and establishing your own individual creative process. Building on a foundation of the fundamentals of abstract painting, this class will introduce new techniques to consider for both the beginner as well as seasoned painters. Participants will take home a 12” x 12” canvas and have the opportunity to examine Chambers’ own work and ask questions about her process.


OFF-SITE EVENTS LISTINGS
Toronto Free Gallery, Toronto
Little Big Man Remix
Thursday, June 28-Tuesday, Aug. 28
Little Big Man Remix by the Contrary Collective takes a multidisciplinary and oppositional stance on pop cultural renderings of Indigenous culture, in particular the film Little Big Man. The Collective’s performance art-theatre-music-visual-art hybrid recreates Little Big Man into a video art piece with live performance in roughly five “acts,” raising questions about the idea of the traitor. This installation is part of the House of Wayward Spirits series of exhibitions curated by Wanda Nanibush, commissioned by ANDPVA and funded by the Ontario Arts Council.

Toronto Pearson International Airport, Toronto
In My Own Eyes
Monday, July 1-Sunday, Sept 30
In Ontario, almost half of Aboriginal people – First Nation, Métis and Inuit – are less than 25 years old. They live on reserves and in towns and cities across the province. For this project, Aboriginal youth, both on-reserve and urban, were mentored by Aboriginal photographers. This project gives Aboriginal youth a chance to share their stories with people across the province, and learn the role that photography can have in storytelling and social change. The exhibition is located post-security in the Terminal 1 domestic departures area near Gate D20. Valid travel documents are required to view the exhibition. You can also visit the online gallery at inmyowneyes.ca. In My Own Eyes is produced in partnership by the Ontario Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, Planet IndigenUS, the Ontario First Nations Young Peoples Council and the Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres’ Youth Council.

Bata Shoe Museum, Toronto
Red Runners: The new objectification of Native art and identity
Wednesday, Aug. 1-Friday, Aug. 31
Curators Jason Jenkins and Luke Parnell challenged fellow Aboriginal artists to re-imagine the most common of objects: a pair of plain white running shoes. The interpretations vary widely but their common root is the Aboriginal viewpoint. Produced by Thunderbird, the Aboriginal arts and culture brand of the Miziwe Biik Development Corporation (MBDC).

The Gladstone Hotel, Toronto
Frost: The Lives and Culture of the Sami people
Friday, Aug. 10-Sunday, Aug. 19
Sami culture is one of hardship, driven by the extreme survival skills needed to get through the long gruelling Nordic arctic winters. The nomadic Sami have herded reindeer for centuries, but today, the culture is disappearing as many have moved to different parts of the country to lead “ordinary” modern lives, abandoning their traditional way of life. Fred Ivar Utsi Klemetsen, a Sami photographer, documents life in the north. Part of the exhibition is on display at Harbourfront Centre. In partnership with the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

Japanese Paper Place, Toronto
Celebrating: Washi and Two Cultures
Friday, Aug. 10-Friday, Aug. 31
While the 1400-year-old tradition of Japanese papermaking continues to this day, it has undergone several reinventions over the years. The use of washi (traditional Japanese paper) by artists from around the world, who have no pre-conceived notions of how it should be used, is a boon to the art, opening eyes and possibilities. In this exhibition, Indigenous artists, most of whom are using washi for the first time, employ their own techniques in using Japanese paper. Opening reception, Wednesday, Aug. 15 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Museum of Inuit Art, Toronto
Museum of Inuit Art
Friday, Aug. 10-Sunday, Aug. 19
MIA will be offering complimentary guided tours of the museum, located at the historic Queen’s Quay Terminal, every day for the duration of the festival at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Young Gallery, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto
Toronto Now: Lisa Myers and Autumn Chacon
Saturday, Aug 11-Sunday, Oct. 28
Lisa Myers, a Toronto-based artist, musician and chef, and Autumn Chacon, an artist from Albequerque, New Mexico, met while participating in a Banff residency for aboriginal artists structured around the idea of the trading post, which manifested itself in the trade (or gifting) of ideas, skills and material goods. As the artists’ exploration of the origins and migrations of indigenous recipes uncovered unexpected connections between the foods prepared in places separated by great distances, they also provide a compelling perspective on the question of the local that is so central to the Toronto Now series. Opening reception: Wednesday, Aug. 15 from 6-8 p.m.

Fort York National Historic Site, Toronto
CBC's 8TH FIRE Series
Monday, Aug. 13-Thursday, Aug. 16 at 7 p.m.
Each night, the Blue Barracks at Fort York will host a screening of an episode of the four-part CBC series 8TH FIRE. The series is a provocative, high-energy journey through our nation’s Aboriginal communities demonstrating the need to fix Canada's 500-year-old relationship with Indigenous peoples. With an energetic pace and stunning HD landscapes, the series propels viewers past prejudice, stereotypes and misunderstandings to encounters with an impressive new generation of Aboriginal Canadians who are reclaiming both their culture and their confidence.

Toronto Public Library, Toronto
Planet IndigenUS at the Toronto Public Library
Friday, Aug. 17
Join the Toronto Public Library in celebrating Indigenous cultures with events in various branches. At 10 a.m. at the Parliament Street branch catch Australian dance-theatre company Polytoxic’s Trade Winds; at 2 p.m. at the North York Central Library, hear the stories of Rabbit and Bear Paws, which are set in 1750’s colonized North America and use traditional native teachings and humour to teach life lessons.

Brant Historical Society, Brantford, Ontario
Falen Johnson: Invisible Stories
Tuesday & Thursday, Aug. 14 & 16 at 7 p.m.
Actor and playwright Falen Johnson examines the stories of the past through performance-based art walks which add historical gravitas by physically placing viewers in the geography of the narratives. In 2010, Johnson presented Invisible Toronto, which took audiences on a walking tour as she shared little-known stories of the urban landscape and its residents. This summer, she brings the experience to Brantford’s downtown core – a neighbourhood she knows well, having grown up there.

Textile Museum of Canada, Toronto
Dreamland: Textiles and the Canadian Landscape
Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 6:30 p.m.
Explore the role of textiles in the interactions between Canada’s First Nations and early immigrants, and the ways in which textiles communicate identity during a special tour of the exhibition Dreamland: Textiles and the Canadian Landscape.

Native Child and Family Services of Toronto
Native Child and Family Services Aboriginal Market
Native Child and Family Services of Toronto is an Aboriginal culture based agency that provides a holistic approach to programs and services of child-care and family well-being within the GTA. Their Aboriginal Market features jazz composer, singer, songwriter, jazz guitarist and bassist, Robin Ranger, an Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) from Fort William First Nation.

McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, Ontario
Fashionality: Dress and Identity in Contemporary Canadian Art
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 2 p.m.
Join Anna Stanisz, Assistant Curator, Programs and Education, on a tour of the McMichael's current special exhibition Fashionality: Dress and Identity in Contemporary Canadian Art curated by Julia Pine. The tour will focus on the featured works of Aboriginal artists Kent Monkman, K C Adams, Lori Blondeau, Dana Claxton and Meryl McMaster. Also ongoing is the presentation of films by Aboriginal film makers re-examining the question of dress and identity in Canadian contemporary culture.

Gardiner Museum, Toronto
Indigenous Cuisine
Friday, Aug. 17 at 6 p.m.
Chefs Jamie Kennedy and Ken Steele present a Culinary Series dinner celebrating Indigenous culture, with a world menu of gastronomic harmony inspired by the many First Nations people who work in Jamie Kennedy's kitchen. The evening will feature locally-sourced products from our finest farmers, fisheries and artisans to create a gastronomic exploration of culinary culture. The dinner will derive inspiration from our diversity while celebrating our local bounty. Dinner: $100; dinner and wine pairings: $135 (tax and gratuity included).

Season-Long Events at Harbourfront Centre

Uncharted Waters: Toronto’s Enigmatic Harbour presented with the assistance of the Toronto Port Authority (June 2012-June 2013)
An outdoor, large-scale photo exhibition of the harbour’s people, places, industries, vessels and ecosystems which uncovers the true value of one of Canada’s largest inland ports.

Summer Music in the Garden presented by TD Bank Group (Most Thursdays, 7 p.m. & Sundays, 4 p.m., July-Sept)
Free performances of classical and traditional music from around the world as Summer Music in the Garden enters its 13th season. Concerts and tours take place in the Toronto Music Garden weather permitting; contact our info desk at 416-973-4000 for updates.

Dancing on the Pier (Thursdays, June 28-Aug. 30, 7-9 p.m.)
Join the Dancing on the Pier house band for social interaction and learning that explores global dance trends, hosted by Martin Samuels.

Free Flicks (Wednesdays, July 4-Aug. 29, approximately 9 p.m.)
From classic film to cult comedy, we explore the journey of the underdog from zero to hero on the big screen, under the stars, hosted by Norm Wilner.

International Marketplace (Weekends June 2-Sept 3)
Shop the world every weekend, all summer long – from Indonesian textiles and Indigenous crafts to African artefacts, South American jewellery and far beyond.

World Café (Weekends May 19-Sept 3)
Our newly renovated World Café features a rotating selection of the best international cuisine at affordable prices.

Harbourfront Centre Street Stage (weekends from Victoria Day to Thanksgiving, 9 a.m.-11 p.m.)
Come and see some of the best street performers this city has to offer!

Canoe Rides and Paddle Boats on the Natrel® Pond (Weekends, May-Oct)
Take a break and enjoy a fun float beside our picturesque boardwalk. Cost: Canoe rides are $4 per person, paddle boats are $5 per person, including life jacket rental and a 15-minute ride.


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