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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
World’s largest Indigenous festival comes to Harbourfront Centre
Planet IndigenUS Festival Co-Produced by Woodland Cultural Centre
Aug 10-19, 2012

TORONTO, ON (June 18, 2012) – It’s a festival so big, it only happens once every three years: Harbourfront Centre is pleased to announce the return of the world’s largest multi-disciplinary, contemporary, international Indigenous arts festival. Planet IndigenUS, co-produced by Woodland Cultural Centre, is a ten-day region-wide celebration, August 10-19, bookended by festival weekends at Harbourfront Centre.

The festival celebrates the future of Indigenous culture while honouring the past by presenting international artists steeped in local traditions and devoted to pushing their art forms into new realms. An amazing array of talent will be on display at Harbourfront Centre and at dozens of partner sites across the region.

Planet IndigenUS highlights include:
• Music from an international assortment of artists including: Derek Miller’s Robbie Robertson tribute; Hanggai’s Mongolian folk via Beijing, mind-blowing didjetronica from Tjupurru (Australia), space-aged cellist Cris Derksen; Transjoik’s Nordic throat-singing meets rap and muezzin prayer-call, A Tribe Called Red’s multi-media Electric Pow-Wow;
• The North American premier of Susuriwka – Willow Bridge, a collaboration between Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, Yokohama Noh Theatre and Ainu (Japan) musician Oki;
• A multi-disciplinary Opening Night Spectacle hosted by Wab Kinew and Sarah Podemski;
• Visual artist Raymond Boisjoly’s take on the roots of “Toronto” and several group exhibitions;
• Comedy night at Woodland Cultural Centre featuring Don Burnstick and Charlie Hill;
• …and much more!

A portion of the listings information for events at Harbourfront Centre and Woodland Cultural Centre is below, with more to follow in the coming weeks. More info is available at the festival website, harbourfrontcentre.com/planetindigenus. For additional information and complete event listings, the public may visit harbourfrontcentre.com/summer or call the Information Hotline at 416-973-4000. Harbourfront Centre is located at 235 Queens Quay West in the heart of downtown Toronto’s waterfront.

ABOUT HARBOURFRONT CENTRE SUMMER FESTIVALS
Harbourfront Centre is an innovative, non-profit cultural organization which provides internationally renowned programming in the arts, culture, education and recreation, in the heart of Toronto's downtown waterfront. Our summer festival season runs from Victoria Day weekend through Thanksgiving weekend, and features over 20 festivals and events that offer The World in One Place. For more information visit harbourfrontcentre.com/summer

ABOUT WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE
The Woodland Cultural Centre is a non-profit organization which preserves and promotes the culture and heritage of the First Nations of the Eastern Woodland area.

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Media Contact: Jon Campbell | jcampbell@harbourfrontcentre.com | 416 973 4655

For listings info, hi-res images and more media resources, visit Planet IndigenUS’s media page:
harbourfrontcentre.com/summer/media/planetindigenus

To unsubscribe from Harbourfront Centre's media database, please email: media_relations_dpt@harbourfrontcentre.com

PLANET INDIGENUS HIGHLIGHTS

HARBOURFRONT CENTRE EVENTS

MUSIC
Celebrating The Crossroads – Opening Night Spectacle
Friday, Aug. 10 at 7 p.m.
Produced by the multi-talented Jennifer Podemski, the evening will engage audiences and evoke a sense of transformation about Indigenous cultures. Hosted by Anishinaabe hip hop artist and CBC producer/host Wab Kinew and Ojibway/Israeli actress Sarah Podemski, the evening features a range of performers including: hip-hop impresario Plex, singing sensation Fara Palmer, multi-award-winning blues rocker George Leach, hoop dancer/musician Dallas Arcand, a performance from Beijing-based Mongolian folk act Hanggai, plus an Indigenous Café hosted by singer/storyteller Eddy Robinson.

Hanggai (China)
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 3 p.m.
Veterans of Beijing’s rock scene and hyper-urbanization, the members of Hanggai embody the new generation of Chinese at the crossroads between their future and their heritage; a generation yearning to reconnect with its roots in the face of a dominating mainstream culture. They employ not just electric guitars and drums, but horse-head fiddle, tobshuur (two-stringed lute) and throat singing, melding the traditional and contemporary into something new. In partnership with the Consulate General of China in Toronto.

Pacific Curls (New Zealand)
Saturday, Aug.11 at 4 p.m.
With a cornerstone of Pacific rhythms, vivacious fiddle playing and evocative Maori instrumentation and lyrics, Pacific Curls have pioneered a fusion sound that seamlessly blends their indigenous roots. The trio has accumulated an impressive instrumental collection featuring the ukulele, cajon, fiddle, taonga puoro (traditional Maori instruments), guitar, stomp box, kalimba, various percussive instruments and sing in Te Reo Maori, Rotuman and English. In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

Kinnie Starr
Saturday, Aug.11 at 8 p.m.
The tri-lingual MC, singer, musician, producer, poet, actress, and artist Kinnie Starr releases her sixth album this month. More than just a hip-hop-folk-fusion musician and producer, she was cast in Cirque du Soleil‘s famed x- rated show, Zumanity; published a book of poetry and artwork; is a yoga student, teacher and advocate; teaches at the Manitoba Audio Recording Industry Association; co-founded Vancouver’s Aboriginal Music Lab; and promotes literacy and authentic expression through hip hop and poetry through ArtStarts.

Digging Roots
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 9:30 p.m.
Co-headlining along with Kinnie Starr in an evening of Indigenous beats, blues and rhythms is blues-roots-rockers Digging Roots. The band’s latest Juno-winning album, We Are, was co-produced with Starr and features carefully crafted songs, tight studio arrangements and soulful performances.

A Tribe Called Red in Concert
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 11 p.m.
DJ Bear Witness, DJ NDN and DJ Shug bring their infectious mix of traditional drums, Jamaican dub and urban beats – what they call Pow Wow Step – back to Toronto. The group, whose debut album is on the Polaris Music Prize’s long list, is committed to showcasing Native urban culture through their music as well as their Electric Pow Wow, which features a rotating cast of guests. Their Planet IndigenUS show marks the finale of First Peoples Cinema film programme at TIFF Bell Lightbox, and features brand new video for the visual component to their live multi-media experience. ATCR will also lead a video and music mixing workshop in the afternoon prior to the concert. In partnership with TIFF.

OKA (Australia)
Sunday, Aug. 12 at 3 p.m.
Australian trio OKA explore and embrace new technologies in the creation of their sound, blending earthy, tribal tones alongside modern sounds. Between computerized beats and samples, didgeridoo, haunting melodies, bamboo flutes, harmonica, slide guitar and more, they create tribal music for the digital era.

Benny Walker
Friday, Aug. 17 at 9 p.m.
Indigenous singer/songwriter Benny Walker is establishing himself as one of Australia’s most charming and engaging independent artists. Nominated for Most Promising New Talent at the Deadly Awards and at the 2011 National Indigenous Music Awards, his soulful voice and love of diverse musical styles sees him combine blues and roots with reggae to create a unique experience.

Robbie Robertson Tribute Show featuring Derek Miller and Special Guests
Friday, Aug. 17 at 9:30 p.m.
Multiple Juno-Award-winner Derek Miller celebrates the work of one of Canada’s most iconic Aboriginal songwriters, Robbie Robertson.

Emerging Talent Showcase: Ali Fontaine, IsKwé and Cris Derksen
Saturday, Aug.18 at 4:30 p.m.

Ali Fontaine
Ali Fontaine is a 17-year-old country artist from Manitoba’s Sagkeeng First Nation who won her first singing competition at age 8 and hasn’t looked back since. She scooped up three awards at the 2011 Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards and saw her first single go to the top of the National Aboriginal Music Countdown chart. In partnership with Manitoba Aboriginal and Northern Affairs.

IsKwé
Coming from a mixed background of Irish and Cree/Dene ethnicity, Winnipeg native IsKwé pulls from both of her cultures and beyond to create a unique trip-hop-meets-eclectic-soul sound. Having just wrapped up a US tour with the infamous NYC collective FreakNasty, she remains committed to giving back to the Native community, promoting positive change and education through facilitating youth workshops and supporting various native youth organizations, both in Canada and the USA.

Cris Derksen
Cellist Derksen is known for captivating solo performances that combine her classical training and Aboriginal ancestry with new-school electronics, building layers of sound into dance music. While she has performed with hip hop star Kanye West, Kinnie Starr, Lightning Dust (Black Mountain) and many more artists, her solo work has been turning heads. Her 2011 debut album, The Cusp, was nominated for a Western Canadian Music Award, and won a 2011 Canadian Aboriginal Music Award; in 2012 she received funding from First Tracks to make an APTN music video for “pow.wow.wow” and was nominated for a Dora Award for her work on the soundtrack to Kaha:wi Dance Theatre’s TransMigration.

Transjoik (Norway)
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 3 p.m.
Equal parts song, joik (a Nordic aboriginal singing style), a muezzin’s call to prayer, rap and recitation, the four musicians in Transjoik use their voices in an altogether new way. The group’s sound is derived from old joik wax-cylinder recordings processed through electronic, ambient and trance music, establishing a mood that is at once modern and timeless. In partnership with the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

Rhombus (New Zealand)
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 9:30 p.m.
Known as one of New Zealand’s most original and energetic live acts, Rhombus blends hip hop, soul, funk, dub and reggae, spliced together with socially conscious lyrics. The band has performed alongside St Germain, Michael Franti, Gomez and more, and won a slew of awards including New Zealand's Most Promising New Act in 2002; Best Video, Best Electronic Album and Best Album at 2003's New Zealand b-Net Music Awards and recently Best Aotearoa (New Zealand) Album finalist at the NZ 2006 Music Awards. The group also works on a number of causes and with various organizations including Greenpeace, tsunami relief, surf-aid, the Cancer Society, and the Peace Boat. In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

Tjupurru (Australia)
Sunday, Aug.19 at 2 p.m.
Tjupurru plays the didgeribone, a combination trombone-didgeridoo, which alone would make him a unique artist. But combined with a “face bass” – an in-mouth microphone, of sorts – and loops, samples and electronics, he takes things even further, creating a music all his own.

FAMILY
Joe Harawira (New Zealand)
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 5 p.m.
Born and bred on the north island of New Zealand, Harawira is a storyteller and expert in Maori tikanga (protocols) and is a passionate teacher and performer of kapahaka (performing arts). In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

Rabbit and Bear Paws
Sunday, Aug. 18 at 2 p.m.
Set in 1750’s colonized North America and featuring the comical adventures of two brothers, Rabbit and Bear Paws uses traditional native teachings and humour to teach life lessons from numerous pranks and mistakes while appreciating the unity of Native communities and how they related to one another peacefully.

Porcupine and Friends: Emilie Corbiere
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 1 & 3:30 p.m.
Emilie Corbiere, a descendant from Walpole Island First Nation, wrote her first play at the age of 8. In 2006, she wrote her first Aboriginal children’s storybook, Porcupine’s Bad Day, the first in what is now a four-book series. Each story employs both Ojibwe and English, teaching young readers new Ojibwe words.

VISUAL ARTS
captured speech writing back: Toronto
Saturday, June 30-Sunday, August 26
As part of the current exhibition Tools for Conviviality, artist Raymond Boisjoly will produce a public exterior text-based work on the south façade of The Power Plant conceived around the visual recuperation of the name “Toronto” premised on its meaning and origin. It foregrounds language as a cultural practice and brings a concern for Aboriginal languages to bear on text-based strategies in contemporary art.

Not So Fast
Saturday, July 21-Sunday, Sept 23
Objects tell a story through the way they are made, but value is often measured in terms of speed and efficiency, necessitating a reconsideration of time and place to reveal different kinds of value. This exhibition features the works of seven Indigenous artists as they engage and respond to various facets of consumer society and its many products and by-products including communication, stereotypes, obsolescence, extinction, colonialism, fast food and more. Not So Fast invites audiences to slow down and spend some time. Curated by Lisa Myers and featuring Christian Chapman, Vanessa Dion Fletcher, Bev Koski, Jean Marshall, Tania Willard, Luke Parnell and Maika'i Tubbs.

Frost: The Lives and Culture of the Sami People (Norway)
Friday-Sunday Aug. 10-12 & 17-19
Sami culture is one of hardship, driven by the extreme survival skills needed to get through the long gruelling Nordic arctic winters. The nomadic Sami have herded reindeer for centuries, but today, the culture is disappearing as many have moved to different parts of the country to lead “ordinary” modern lives, abandoning their traditional way of life. Fred Ivar Utsi Klemetsen, a Sami photographer, documents life in the north. In partnership with the Royal Norwegian Embassy.

Exhibition from the Aboriginal Visual Culture Program at OCAD University
Friday-Sunday Aug. 10-12 & 17-19
Works by students in the Aboriginal Visual Culture Program at OCAD (Ontario College of Art and Design) University will highlight the diversity and beauty of the student body. Established in 2008, the program fosters and disseminates Indigenous culture through art and design to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students.

FILM
IndigenUS Short Films Series
Sunday, Aug. 12 at 2:30 p.m.
Sloth pokes gentle fun at stereotypes about the Inuit people, past and present; Games of the North follows four Inuit athletes competing across Alaska in ancestral games of strength; Amaqqut Nunaat - The Country of Wolves follows two brothers on a seal hunt who drift on broken sea ice and arrive at a strange and distant land.

imagineNATIVE’s indigiFLIX: Music is the Medicine
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 8 p.m.
Over the past 20 years, blues-rocker Derek Miller has built a highly devoted fan base, received numerous awards – including two Junos – and played with a long list of world class musicians, all the while struggling with addiction and personal loss. This revealing documentary follows the now-reinvigorated artist.

Artists’ and Directors’ Talk
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 2 p.m.
imagineNative Film Festival’s Executive Director Jason Ryle moderates a discussion of the importance of Indigenous film and the process by which Michelle Latimer, Shane Belcourt, Nima Ehetemam and Noah Wohl have created their works.

DANCE
Susuriwka - Willow Bridge (Japan-Canada)
(NOTE: ticketed event at the Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay West: $30, student and group rates available)
Friday, Aug. 17 at 7 p.m., Saturday, Aug 18 at 2 & 7 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 19 at 7 p.m.
The North American premier of the collaboration between multiple 2012 Dora Award nominee Kaha:wi Dance Theatre and the Ainu (Japan) musician Oki. At its essence, Susuriwka - Willow Bridge explores the connection between Iroquois and Ainu song and dance, and expresses and honours our many shared cultural beliefs while seeking relevance and empowerment from ancient teachings in today’s reality.

New Mexico Dances (USA)
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 1, 3 & 5 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 12 at 2 & 4 p.m.
Dancers from New Mexico’s Native American population will thrill audiences with their distinctive culture and dance. While only representative of a fraction of New Mexico’s native population, the groups provide an important window into the diversity of the state. Sponsored by the State of New Mexico Department of Indian Affairs, and in collaboration with the New Mexico Tourism Department.

Polytoxic: Trade Winds (Australia)
Thursday, Aug. 16-Saturday, Aug. 18 at 9 p.m.
Australian dance-theatre company Polytoxic returns to Planet IndigenUS with a striking new performance taking place in and on The Natrel® Pond. Combining stunning projections, bold costuming and intricate physical performance, Trade Winds reimagines the exchanges of Pacific Ocean exploration past and present in a technicolour world where the traditions of the Pacific collide with the trappings of pop culture. The production invites audiences to contribute by adding to the collection of messages on tiny boats floating on the pond. In partnership with the Australia Arts Council.

Tjimur Dance Theatre (Taiwan)
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 8:30 p.m.
Inspired by Paiwan traditions, Tijimur Dance Theatre is one of Taiwan’s most exciting Indigenous contemporary dance companies. The company, whose Chinese name contains the characters for “old” and “new” and references the village that is the cradle of Paiwan culture, suggests that the group’s new spirit of dance is inspired by that ancient culture. In partnership with Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York and the Asian Canadian Special Events Association.

LITERARY
Authors At Harbourfront Centre
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 7 p.m.
Thomas King, one of Canada's premier Native public intellectuals, is of Cherokee, Greek, and German descent. For the past five decades, he has worked as an activist for Native causes, as an administrator in Native programs, and has taught Native literature and history at universities in the U.S. and Canada. The first Aboriginal person to deliver the prestigious Massey Lectures, he is also the bestselling, award-winning author of five novels and two collections of short stories. He will preview his latest work The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America, which examines North America's relationship with Native people through historical events and figures as well as film, activism, pop culture and more, and is scheduled for release in November.

Drew Hayden Taylor, an Ojibway from the Curve Lake First Nations, is a journalist, scriptwriter, and award-winning playwright who has worked on more than 17 documentaries exploring Native experience and is the author of non-fiction and a novel for young adults. A finalist for a Governor General’s Literary Award, Motorcycles & Sweetgrass, is the story of magic, family, a mysterious stranger, in a sleepy Anishnawbe community.

Brian Wright-McLeod is a music journalist, radio broadcaster, author of The Encyclopedia of Native Music and the executive producer of the 3-CD companion box set The Soundtrack of a People. He began working as a music journalist in 1979 and continues to write articles and reviews on Native music for numerous publications including News From Indian Country, Native Peoples Magazine, and the Smithsonian's American Indian. His latest work is Red Power, a graphic novel exploring the physical and spiritual journey of a boy and his Native Movement chapter when they are called in to assist community members caught in the middle of a manufactured land struggle.

Rene Meshake
Sunday, Aug. 12 at 1 p.m.
The author/illustrator of 3 children’s books and 4 books of poetry, Rene Meshake is a storyteller, visual artist, spoken-word performer, musician and filmmaker who seamlessly fuses Ojibwe and English words into his stories, poetry and spoken word performances, communicating his spiritual heritage to the contemporary world.

WORKSHOPS
Video & Music Mixing Workshop: A Tribe Called Red
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 3:30 p.m.
DJ Bear Witness, DJ NDN and DJ Shug’s combine what they call Pow Wow Step music – an infectious mix of traditional drums, Jamaican dub and urban beats – with video to create a live experience like no other. In this workshop, the group will talk about everything from their live performances and creative process to their experiences in the music industry and the political side of their work, confronting stereotypes and creating an urban Indigenous identity.

FASHION
Sage Paul Fashion Show
Friday, Aug. 17 at 7 p.m.
Sage Paul creates modern Indigenous fashion, culturally-inspired apparel and accessories that are bold, classic and chic. Committed to creating an accurate representation of contemporary Indigenous people and ethically producing and commissioning unique, trendy and quality-made products, she works with both Indigenous and Western cultural and traditional concepts seeking to identify the “urban Indian” through her work. The fashions on display at this show have been designed specifically for Planet IndigenUS.

MISC
Shared Perspectives – An Evening of Reconciliation
Tuesday, Aug. 14 at 7:30 p.m.
Join the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada for an evening of dialogue and celebration of cultures in the spirit of reconciliation. The evening will include keynote addresses from the Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the TRC, and Reverend Jesse Jackson of the Rainbow Push Coalition, as well as an authors’ dialogue moderated by Shelagh Rogers, host of CBC Radio One’s The Next Chapter. In addition, Shared Perspectives will be infused with drumming and dancing celebrating the richness of culture and tradition with two-time world award winning Hoop Dancer Lisa Odjig and the powerfully moving drum beats of Beyond Sound Empijah.

WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE EVENTS

MUSIC
Power of the Voice, Heart of the Drum: The Breaking Wind, New Credit Showcase, Goombine, Hanggai and Six Nations Women Singers
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 1:30 p.m.

The Breaking Wind
Forming as a trio of young teens, The Breaking Wind’s hard-rockin’ music mixes influences ranging from the Beatles to Coltrane. They performed as part of the Mother Earth/LIVE EARTH concert in Washington, D.C., and one of their songs was used by ABC Sports’ Saturday Night Football.

New Credit Showcase
Artists from the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation dazzle with an array of talent from their community. Helping to open and close the festival at Woodland, come and enjoy a sampling of the sights and sounds of what New Credit has to offer.

Goombine (Australia)
A descendant of the Wadi Wadi people of the Yuin nation of Australia, Goombine is a keeper of traditional Aboriginal knowledge actively involved in the preservation of Aboriginal culture through sharing Aboriginal song and dance. His international experience includes performances at the 2008 Beijing Olympics Opening Ceremony, for which he choreographed the Indigenous Australian section, and the Opening Ceremony of the Rugby World Cup, as well as across Ausltralia. He currently is involved in developing and implementing drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs incorporating traditional healing methods.

Hanggai (China)
Veterans of Beijing’s rock scene and hyper-urbanization, the members of Hanggai embody the new generation of Chinese at the crossroads between their future and their heritage; a generation yearning to reconnect with its roots in the face of a dominating mainstream culture. They employ not just electric guitars and drums, but horse-head fiddle, tobshuur (two-stringed lute) and throat singing, melding the traditional and contemporary into something new. In partnership with the Consulate General of China in Toronto.

Six Nations Women Singers
The Six Nations Women Singers is a Haudenosaunee vocal ensemble that has been performing for over 30 years, and contributing in a rare manner to their community by giving their performance earnings back to help the needy. They have performed at the American Folklife Festival, the New Orleans Jazz Festival, on university campuses all across North America, and in many international venues. Their album, We Will All Sing, was released in 1996, and they participated in the Smithsonian Institution's production of Heartbeat: Voices of First Nations Women recordings.

Maori Day: Pacific Curls (New Zealand)
Sunday, Aug 12 at 5 p.m.
With a cornerstone of Pacific rhythms, vivacious fiddle playing and evocative Maori instrumentation and lyrics, Pacific Curls have pioneered a fusion sound that seamlessly blends their indigenous roots. The trio has accumulated an impressive instrumental collection featuring the ukulele, cajon, fiddle, taonga puoro (traditional Maori instruments), guitar, stomp box, kalimba, various percussive instruments and sing in Te Reo Maori, Rotuman and English. In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

OKI (Japan)
Tuesday, Aug. 14, 8 p.m.
Born to a Japanese mother and an Ainu father, OKI received his first tonkori – the traditional Ainu stringed instrument – after a five-year stint in the US film business, and was inspired to relocate to Hokkaido, where he taught himself to play, and build, the instrument. He has since become the most prominent tonkori performer in the world, fusing reggae, African and electronic music with Ainu folk melodies. Through his active participation in the United Nations' Working Group on Indigenous Populations (WGIP), OKI has developed a network with other indigenous artists, performing with many of them around the world. His collaboration with Six Nations and Toronto company Kaha:Wi Dance Theatre for their production of Susuriwka – Willow Bridge sees its North American premier at Planet IndigenUS.

Trailblazers and Music Makers: Ali Fontaine and Susan Aglukark
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 9 p.m.
Join us for a night of powerful music featuring the beautiful vocals of Susan Aglukark and up-and-coming country singer Ali Fontaine.

Ali Fontaine
Ali Fontaine is a 17-year-old country artist from Manitoba’s Sagkeeng First Nation who won her first singing competition at age 8 and hasn’t looked back since. She scooped up three awards at the 2011 Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards and saw her first single go to the top of the National Aboriginal Music Countdown chart. In partnership with Manitoba Aboriginal and Northern Affairs.

Susan Aglukark
One of Canada’s most unique and honoured artists, Aglukark is an Inuk from Arviat, Nunavut whose career has been defined by her ability to straddle and bridge both the world of her heritage and that of popular music generally. She entered the limelight in 1992 with her debut album, Arctic Rose, and quickly rose to national and international prominence, singing songs about her people but speaking to people everywhere.

Rhombus (New Zealand)
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 5 p.m.
Known as one of New Zealand’s most original and energetic live acts, Rhombus blends hip-hop, soul, funk, dub and reggae, spliced together with socially conscious lyrics. The band has performed alongside St Germain, Michael Franti, Gomez and more, and won a slew of awards including New Zealand's Most Promising New Act in 2002; Best Video, Best Electronic Album and Best Album at 2003's New Zealand b-Net Music Awards and recently Best Aotearoa (New Zealand) Album finalist at the NZ 2006 Music Awards. The group also works on a number of causes and with various organizations including Greenpeace, tsunami relief, surf-aid, the Cancer Society, and the Peace Boat. In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

VISUAL ARTS
Greg Staats – A Retrospective
Saturday, Aug. 11-Sunday, Oct. 7
Staats’s work is rooted in ancestry, history and culture. This solo retrospective exhibition highlights this Six Nation artist through a multi-tiered presentation of his multi-media works, ersonal and poignant snapshots of what it is to be Haudenosaunee. On Wednesday, August 15 at 7 p.m., Staats will lecture on his works and process looking back on his 25-year career and walk visitors through his exhibition.

Four From Six
Saturday, Aug. 11-Sunday, Oct 7
In collaboration with curator Shelley Niro, the participating artists have worked to confront and transgress Aboriginal art expectations to create a conversation that explores and scrutinizes cultural stereotypes related to nostalgic echoes of a more natural landscape and traditional community, visions and dream-states, contemporary and urban Indigenous personas, and the recent political tensions such as that surrounding the Six Nations land claims related to Caledonia and the Haldimand tract. Participating artists: Brenda Mitten, Tracey Anthony, Jay Carrier, and Elliott Doxtater Wynn

Elizabeth Doxtater: Teiotiokwaonháston/Deyodyogwaoháhs:doh (Encircles Everything)
Saturday, Aug. 11-Sunday, Oct 7
Elizabeth Doxtater’s work, an installation created from corn husks and depicting a gathering of clanmothers and chiefs at the Tree of Peace, is an homage to the traditions of democracy and peace of the Haundenosaunee Confederacy.

The Graffiti Project
Saturday, Aug. 18 at 5 p.m.
This spring, students of Kawenni:io/Gaweni:yo, a Mohawk and Cayuga immersion school at Six Nations, embarked on a series of art workshops learning the techniques, artistry and potential of graffiti. Their works will be present on site for all to enjoy.

THEATRE
Falen Johnson: Salt Baby
Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 8 p.m.
This first feature play by Six Nations actor, playwright and emerging dramaturg Falen Johnson explores the issue of what it is like to be a contemporary First Nations person growing up not looking like your typical ‘Indian.’ Providing a humorous look at stereotypes and issues of identity, the play’s title is a term for “white-looking Indian” and one that Johnson, with her fair skin and curly hair, often had thrown her way.

DANCE
Lisa Odjig – Intro to Hoop
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 8 p.m.
Two-time world champion hoop dancer and recent semi-finalist of Canada’s Got Talent Lisa Odjig conducts the Intro to Hoop dance workshop. Odjig has performed internationally including at the 2002 Winter Olympics and for dignitaries including Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

COMEDY
Heck Init Comedy Night: Don Burnstick and Charlie Hill
Saturday, Aug 11 at 9 p.m.
“Heck Init” is a commonly-used Six Nations slang term to describe when someone is being unbelievable. The event’s two featured comedians poke fun at stereotypes and political issues – in a mostly believable fashion. Don Burnstick’s young life was spent on the streets until he sobered up at 21 and has, in the 20 years since, been involved in the healing and personal wellness movement, using humour and performance to provide a holistic approach to healing. His highly acclaimed comedy show "You Might be a Redskin - Healing Through Native Humour," is a comedic performance that humorously portrays First Nations people, their habits, likes and dislikes. Charlie Hill’s humour has helped break many stereotypes, a fact acknowledged by Hollywood in the awarding of the 2009 Ivy Bethune Tri-Union Diversity Award. Hill is an actor (Moesha, Roseanne, North of 60, Naturally Native, Harold of Orange and Impure Thoughts), writer (Roseanne and NPR’s Club Red with Charlie Hill) and performer (PBS’s On and Off the Res) and has appeared alongside David Letterman, Jay Leno, Jim Carrey, Robin Williams, and Roseanne as well as on The Late Show with David Letterman as part of the show’s 13th anniversary episode.

FOOD
First Nations Food Fusion Demo: Rich Francis
Saturday, Aug. 11 at 4 p.m.
Rich Francis, proprietor of Aboriginal Culinary Concepts in London, Ontario, will conduct a demonstration of what he calls modern Aboriginal cuisine, which he describes as “unexpected.”

Dotah’s Cooking: Virgie General, Janace Henry and Bertha Skye
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 2 p.m.
Three local female chefs share their favourite family recipes which are about more than just the preparation of food. They represent the stories, relationships and traditions that are integral in Haudenosaunee families.

FAMILY
Family Fun Tent
Saturday, Aug. 11 & 18, Sunday, Aug 12 & 19 at 2 p.m.
The Family Fun Tent is a space where families can create art and learn more about First Nations culture, hosted by writer, illustrator, storyteller and visual artist Lorrie Gallant. Participants will have the opportunity to learn the significance of the wampum belt, with replicas on display complete with the stories they tell and the shells from which the beads were created. Families can make their own wampum and take home their creations.

FILM
Tunniit: Retracing the Lines of Inuit Tattoo
Sunday, Aug 12 at 2 p.m.
A documentary by Alethea Arnaquq-Baril following her struggle over whether or not to get the traditional facial tattoos of her ancestors and exploring the artform that has been forbidden and nearly forgotten for almost a century.

Outdoor Movie Magic: Whale Rider and Boy
Sunday, Aug 12 at 7 p.m.
Bring your lawn chair and blankets, sprawl out on the grass and join us for a night of movie magic at Woodland.

Whale Rider (PG-13)
A contemporary story of love, rejection and triumph as a young Maori girl fights to fulfill a destiny her grandfather refuses to recognize.

Boy (NR)
Set on the east coast of New Zealand in 1984, the title character is an 11-year-old devout Michael Jackson fan with a chance to get to know his father, who has returned to find a bag of money he buried years ago.


Film Programme: The Creator’s Game
Thursday, Aug. 16 at 9 p.m.
In 2010, the Iroquois Nationals lacrosse team chose to forfeit the World Championship when they were denied entry into England because of their Haudenosaunee passports. This documentary follows the team on their journey to the 2011 championships in Prague – a fight for both gold and recognition of their nationhood. The Creator’s Game was the Documentary Pitch Prize winner at imagineNATIVE 2010.

LITERARY
Maori Day: Joe Harawira (New Zealand)
Sunday, Aug. 12 at 3:30 p.m.
Born and bred on the north island of New Zealand, Harawira is a storyteller and expert in Maori tikanga (protocols) and is a passionate teacher and performer of kapahaka (performing arts). In partnership with Creative New Zealand (Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa).

Season-Long Events at Harbourfront Centre

Uncharted Waters: Toronto’s Enigmatic Harbour presented with the assistance of the Toronto Port Authority (June 21, 2012-June 2013)
An outdoor, large-scale photo exhibition of the harbour’s people, places, industries, vessels and ecosystems which uncovers the true value of Canada’s largest inland port.

Summer Music in the Garden presented by TD Bank Group (Most Thursdays, 7 p.m. & Sundays, 4 p.m., July-Sept)
Free performances of classical and traditional music from around the world as Summer Music in the Garden enters its 13th season. Concerts and tours take place in the Toronto Music Garden weather permitting; contact our info desk at 416-973-4000 for updates.

Dancing on the Pier (Thursdays, June 28-Aug. 30, 7-9 p.m.)
Join the Dancing on the Pier house band for social interaction and learning that explores global dance trends, hosted by Martin Samuels.

Free Flicks (Wednesdays, July 4-Aug. 29, approximately 9 p.m.)
From classic film to cult comedy, we explore the journey of the underdog from zero to hero on the big screen, under the stars, hosted by Norm Wilner.

International Marketplace (Weekends June 2-Sept 3)
Shop the world every weekend, all summer long – from Indonesian textiles and Indigenous crafts to African artefacts, South American jewellery and far beyond.

World Café (Weekends May 19-Sept 3)
Our newly renovated World Café features a rotating selection of the best international cuisine at affordable prices.

Harbourfront Centre Street Stage (weekends from Victoria Day to Thanksgiving, 9 a.m.-11 p.m.)
Come and see some of the best street performers this city has to offer!

Canoe Rides and Paddle Boats on the Natrel® Pond (Weekends, May-Oct)
Take a break and enjoy a fun float beside our picturesque boardwalk. Cost: Canoe rides are $4 per person, paddle boats are $5 per person, including life jacket rental and a 15-minute ride.
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